Pisgah Primitive Baptist Church

We're leaving the big city behind for this post.  Everyone in central Alabama knows US Highway 231.  It takes you from Montgomery down to Troy and then on to Dothan.  Eventually it will take you all the way to Panama City, Florida.  But before all of that, US-231 takes you to the southeastern corner of Montgomery County.  

Just before you hit the county line, take AL-94 north.  A few more turns will bring you to the Pisgah Primitive Baptist Church.  I assure you, if there is a single historical marker in Montgomery County that no one has ever accidentally passed by, this would be that marker.  But that's a shame, because the church and its grounds are beautiful.  I don't have a lot of information to share about the church, so this post will mostly be about the photos, but if you ever find yourself wanting to go for a drive in southern Montgomery County, this is definitely a spot worth visiting.

Wide view, Pisgah Primitive Baptist Church, Montgomery County, Alabama

As you can see, the church is exceedingly well cared for, with exceptional landscaping and a picturesque stone wall surrounding the cemetery on both sides of the church's rear.  You can read the historical marker text in the quote or in the next photo.

Pisgah Primitive Baptist Church

Constituted on August 27, 1842 on this site with six charter members including Moses and Sarah Rushton, Susannah Rushton, William and Emily Miley, and James Gardner. First structure built of logs by master carpenter Jesse Yon on land given by Moses Rushton, who moved to Montgomery County from Orangeburg District S.C.

Present Colonial Revivial building completed in 1931. Architect was Frank W. Lockwood and landscape architect was Graham M. Rushton.
— Alabama Historical Association, 1989

Historical Marker, Pisgah Primitive Baptist Church, Montgomery County, Alabama

The current building just entered its 85th year.  

The next four photos show a closeup of the church's front, as well as closer views of the cemetery and the Dinner On The Grounds pavilion on the north side of the property.

Front view, Pisgah Primitive Baptist Church, Montgomery County, Alabama

South side cemetery, Pisgah Primitive Baptist Church, Montgomery County, Alabama

Building, grounds, and pavilion, Pisgah Primitive Baptist Church, Montgomery County, Alabama

North side cemetery and pavilion, Pisgah Primitive Baptist Church, Montgomery County, Alabama

I also stumbled across this U.S. Geological Survey marker in the ground just a few feet from the cemetery wall on the south side of the church.

U.S. Geological Survey marker, Pisgah Primtive Baptist Church, Montgomery County, Alabama

As you can probably tell from the shadows in the earlier pictures, I was really racing the light by the time I got to the church, so I decided to stick around for a few minutes to get a shot of the sunset.  This was taken from the church's front steps.

Sunset, Grady, Alabama

As I mentioned earlier, there isn't a lot of history in this post.  The church is technically in Grady, but it's really in the middle of nowhere.  The original congregation came together four years before the state capital moved to Montgomery, and they were celebrating their tenth anniversary when the final touches were put on the current capitol building.  To make up for the lack of historical facts, our next post will take us to Selma to learn which Alabamian is the highest office holder in the history of the United States.